More Airbags To Be Recalled In Future

18:58' 29-05-2018
Alarm bells rang in the motoring world last year when a Sydney man was killed, and a Northern territory woman was injured, because faulty Takata airbags fitted in their cars exploded. To date, Takata airbags have caused more than 230 injuries and at least 23 deaths worldwide.

    Kết quả hình ảnh cho faulty Takata airbags

    Photo: stuff.co.nz

    The faulty airbags degrade over time, resulting in them firing metal shards at a car's occupants. The airbags have been part of a global recall since 2009, leading to the recall of about 100 million vehicles. However, some manufacturers were still fitting the airbags, without the knowledge of owners.

    The Australian Competition and Consumer Commission (ACCC) launched an investigation, and targeted more than 2.3 million Australian vehicles for recall of airbags. Fourteen car manufacturers carried out voluntary recall programs.

    According to the ABC, a spokesperson for the ACCC says there are still 25,000 vehicles on the road from that initial recall, which affected about 4 million cars in Australia. This includes vehicles added to the list in February this year.

    However, the situation remains one of concern, because the ACCC recently added about a million more cars to the original list. The latest additions include the Audi A5, Mercedes-Benz C-Class, Skoda Octavia, Ford Mondeo, Volkswagen Golf, Holden Cruze and Toyota Yaris.

    Cars on the new “future recall” list will not be a safety risk for many years, says the ACCC, but their airbags will need to be replaced eventually. It is likely that more cars will join the list later.

    You can see the new list at www.productsafety.gov.au/recalls/compulsory-takata-airbag-recall/future-takata-airbag-recalls.

    You should also sign up for free recall notifications at productsafety.gov.au.

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Keywords: airbagsaustralian competition and consumer commissionsydney

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